The City Girl Farmer


Poetry in Motion
May 28, 2009, 9:36 am
Filed under: Uncategorized
IMG_0631

Jazz and Julie coming to the barn through the mist

 

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Roman Catholic Priest Caught Caressing Hot Chick!
May 28, 2009, 9:27 am
Filed under: Chickens, Humor

 

Fr. Dupre with a hot chick

Fr. Dupre with a hot chick

What were YOU thinking???



Picked Up the Rest of the Goats
May 28, 2009, 9:20 am
Filed under: Chickens, Goats | Tags: ,

…and got a new batch of chicks, too.

 

Lola

Lola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carmen

Carmen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New chicks

New chicks



Milking Stand
May 28, 2009, 8:54 am
Filed under: Goats, Tools | Tags: ,

 

The finished product

The finished product

Why would someone who raises Cashmere goats need a milking stand?  To give shots for one thing. 🙂  The little dears need to be groomed and to have their hooves trimmed occasionally and since Cashmere goats usually don’t have their horns removed those can be daunting tasks without a tool to immobilize the goat.

 

We found the plans on Fias Co Farm’s website, went to Lowe’s, purchased about $60 worth of materials and got to work.  We finished in about 9 hours but I’m sure that someone with experience working with wood could knock it out in much less time.  We also did all the sanding by hand.



Horse Love
May 28, 2009, 7:37 am
Filed under: Horses | Tags: , ,
Jazzmin & Rachel

Jazzmin & Rachel

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words.



Nothing Says Home School Dork Like Making Soap From a Yucca
May 9, 2009, 8:14 am
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

Jon found an article about how you can make soap from a yucca and suggested we try it some time as a home school project.  Yuccas are plentiful around here and they are a weed that can take over your pasture, so it seemed like a good idea to make use of the weed.   In fact, I learned yucca has another name:  soapweed.  Who knew?

So off Thomas and I went to stalk the kill.

Returning victorious with hands full of yucca root

Returning victorious with hands full of yucca root

We found a decent sized plant and went about digging it up.  Yucca roots grow deep and we dug a hole about 2 1/2 feet deep and still didn’t get the whole root out.

We came home and started to prepare the roots for the food processor.  They have a thick, bark-like covering, but on the inside they are white and have a consistency much like ginger.

Yucca roots

Yucca roots

Cutting the bark away from the root

Cutting the bark away from the root

Yucca root cleaned and ready to be chopped up

Yucca root cleaned and ready to be chopped up

After the roots were peeled, I washed them, chopped them up and put them into the food processor.  What came out was a creamy white puree about triple in volume to what had gone in.

Processed yucca root

Processed yucca root

I added about 2 cups of water to get the soap into solution and then strained it.  We added some essential oil and voila!  Soap!  It seems to work well and it’s good to know you can do it.  It was a lot of work, though, so I’m not sure that’s how we’ll always get our soap around here.

Update:

I had an allergic reaction to the soap and don’t use it any more.

Straining the puree

Straining the puree

Finished product

Finished product



Goats Get Bladder Infections
May 9, 2009, 7:41 am
Filed under: Goats | Tags: , ,

One reason I decided to try to raise Cashmere goats is because I had read that they were virtually indestructible.  They need hay or pasture, water and enough shelter to keep the wind and rain/snow off them.  That’s it.   They don’t just die like sheep do.

I noticed the day after we picked up Shannon that she was shivering.  I thought that was odd but she had endured a 3- hour trailer ride down from the mountains and it had started to snow on the way home.  We put a heat lamp out in the barn for them thinking that would make her more comfortable.   Both animals seemed to be eating, drinking, peeing and pooping so I thought everything was fine.  Well, a few days later Shannon is clearly having difficulty urinating.  She would squat and only a few drops would come out.  At first I thought it was because we were too close to her and she was shy.  Julie, one of our horses,  doesn’t like it when you watch her go, so I’m thinking I have a shy horse AND a shy goat.  But then she kept squatting, near and far, and it didn’t matter.  Only a few drops came out.  I started to worry then and went to the trusty internet for answers.  I learned that goats are subject to urinary calculi usually from a diet that is not acidic enough.  The kicker was that it affected males almost exclusively.

I called a friend who raises cashmeres, an acquaintance who raises dairy goats and the breeder and all of them said to get her to the vet.  I called our vet and discovered that they did not treat goats.  The closest goat vet is an hour away in Colorado Springs.  So Thomas and I loaded her into the back of the Tahoe and off we went.

The vet tried to catheterize her with no success.  Trying to hold a 100 lb. creature still for a catheter is a nearly impossible task anyway if you ask me.  Taking her temperature was similarly challenging.  She did not have a fever.  Luckily, she was squatting constantly and the vet was able to catch a few drops into a test tube.  The urine was clear and yellow and he took it to examine under a microscope.  When he came back he explained that he had seen some basal cells “which could possibly be indicative of bladder cancer” and no white blood cells which you would expect to see if there were an infection.  He further explained that in order to have a firm diagnosis he would need to do X-rays and dye studies (!).  Of course, the goat would have to be tranquilized because if whe wouldn’t hold still for a catheter, she probably wouldn’t hold still for an X-ray.  He recommended that we treat her for an infection since her symptoms were classic cystitis symptoms except for the lack of white blood cells in the urine.

He sent me home with some Penicillin and a few syringes and told me to give her 3 cc’s twice a day for 7-10 days.  I learned how to give intramuscular shots to a goat by looking at pictures on the internet and confirming with my friend who also has goats.  Thankfully, I haven’t killed her yet.  I don’t know who hates the shots more, though, the goat or me.  I feel like a monster each time I go out with a needle.